Planting Onion Sets in Spring

It is officially spring and I finally had a day I could start planting the onions. I would like to have planted them a few weeks ago but it is by no means too late. I want to make sure my spring cool weather plants are in by April 9th. They came in the mail a week ago and we kept them fresh by storing them in the fridge until we could plant.

Planting onions is going to be a big task this year because dad ordered $27 worth of sets. That’s a LOT of onions! We more than likely will be selling them this fall because I don’t think we will need that many for the year. It’s better to have too many than not enough though and I can’t stand buying produce when I can grow it on my own and know exactly the methods it was grown. I don’t have to worry about consuming pesticides when the food comes from my backyard.

Today we planted 5 beds of onions and we didn’t even use a quarter of what we bought! Yikes… When I lived on the farm it would have been no big deal but when space is limited in the garden you have to plant wisely.

I started working with the beds just like when I did the garlic.  Then I made my rows and started setting the onions in. I made a video so it is easier to see exactly how I do it. Leveling and making rows

I set an onion in the shallow trench I made, allowing the roots to splay out on the soil and not be all bunched up and tangled. Then I move soil to cover the roots and partway up the onion. Tamping it down gently but firmly so the onion will stay standing up and get a good beginning, I move on to the next plant. I made a short little video to show you how. Planting Onions video

The onions we have been growing get huge, so I plant them 5 or 6 inches apart. The recommended spacing is 4 inches. Usually I only do two rows in my 18″wide beds but I’m thinking with as many onions as I have got to find homes for this spring, I may double them up.

I want them to have plenty of room for good air flow. I also want them spaced far enough apart that they are not competing for water and nutrients. Today I planted only the two rows but I’m seriously contemplating going back and doubling what I did. I’ll get the advice of my dad before I do. He, my mom and I are partners in crime as we plan what to grow in our joint garden. 🙂

Now is the time to be getting in you spring plants. These will include lettuces, spinach, radishes, peas, chard, kale, green onions and anything that can handle a little bit of frost as we move into warm weather. I have another post from a couple years ago that might be helpful.

4 weeks before frost date

baby-plants-and-strawberries-in-my-garden-and-what-to-plant-2-weeks-before-the-last-frost-date/

Happy Planting!

Elisa

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Fall Harvest Soup Recipe

Today my son wasn’t feeling well, so I wanted to make a soup to nourish him and make him feel loved 🙂 Don’t you like it when people do things for you when you are sick?! It isn’t very often that we get sick around here so it is kind of a big deal that one of us isn’t feeling well. This particular son ate something completely “un-nourishing” the day before he got sick, so it didn’t take me by surprise that his defenses to germs were down.

We have an abundance of fall garden produce to be using up this winter, so I started with Continue reading “Fall Harvest Soup Recipe”

What I ate Wednesday.

For breakfast today I had oatmeal with maple sugar. I splurged and added some Brown sugar too.
For lunch I made a Red Lentil Dal  and had it over rice. This is a picture of what was left that I will have for lunch over the next few days. No cooking lunch for a while!

Dinner tonight is steamed butternut squash and pasta with a taste of butter  and some parmesan. 

Breakfast is ready for tomorrow too. I soaked 1/2 cup of quinoa today. I drained the water and covered the quinoa in my thermos with boiling water. In the morning it will be cooked and delicious!

Baby plants and strawberries in my garden and what to plant 2 weeks before the last frost date

STRAWBERRIES

See the yellow in the middle of that flower? It is a baby strawberry! We haven’t had to water the strawberries at all this year or really take care of them except to pull the mulch off them in the early Spring and give them some Mittleider weekly feed. It seems that such goodness should come with a much higher price. If you haven’t had a fresh strawberry you just can’t imagine the sweet perfect flavor. The under ripe, chemical laden excuse for strawberries in the stores pale in comparison. Oh how I am excited for strawberry season!

wpid-img_20140430_144759_557.jpg wpid-img_20140430_144837_459.jpg

PLANTING

I have now planted the things that can be put in 2 weeks before the last Spring frost date. These include:

  • Peas
  • Carrots
  • Swiss Chard
  • Beets
  • Parsley
  • Parsnips
  • Turnips

If you live where it is quite dry then you can put in Potatoes too. Where I live the rain still comes down quite frequently and the potatoes can rot before they sprout so I will wait a few weeks for them.

 

BABY PLANTS

wpid-img_20140430_144944_525.jpg
Baby Spinach

 

wpid-img_20140430_144956_348.jpg
Baby Kale

All of the seeds I started a few weeks ago are up and growing beautifully so now I start feeding them the natural Mittleider fertilizer mix once a week.(get it at www.growfood.com and learn how to use it HERE.) A few weeks ago I told you to get your micronutrients ordered and now is the time you will be using them.

I like to set aside one day a week (Mondays for me) to fertilize any garden plants that have sprouted. I stop doing this weekly feed when they are a few weeks from being mature. The fertilizer stays with them a few weeks so I don’t want to waste fertilizer on things I am going to be harvesting.

If I am fertilizing a 30′ x 18″ bed, once a week I will add 16 oz.(a soup can) of weekly feed to the bed near the roots of the plants. You don’t have to till it in or anything, just put in on the surface and when you water or it rains, the fertilizer will go into the soil. Messing up the surface of the soil and getting good contact with the fertilizer will actually help the fertilizer get into the soil better but it is not necessary.

In a 3×8′ bed put down 8 ounces (1 cup) of weekly feed).

As it warms up our plants will shoot up and we will be so grateful for the work we have put in!

Another thing to be doing right now is disturbing the soil in our garden beds. When you do this, weeds that have gotten started will be uprooted and won’t be able to grow. You are not disturbing your seedlings, but the rest of the soil. You aren’t watering the isles with this method of gardening so weeding will be kept to a minimum but to keep it even less, move your soil.

If you are growing straight in the soil, break down the sides of your garden beds and build them back up again to kill any weeds that have been germinating. You will be glad you took the time to do this. Eliminate the weeds while they are small and you will have much less work to do later.

Happy Healthy,

Elisa

 

Groceries for the next week or two

This is the food that I bought for $219 that will feed my family of 7 for the next week or two, depending on how much produce from the garden we supplement it with. We will have more fruit than this because of the double fruit share from a CSA that I purchased earlier in the summer. I just thought it would be fun to post this. My son and I had a fun time trying to make everything fit and be visible on the table. 🙂  I didn’t think of doing this until on the way home from grocery shopping, so this is a very real view of our groceries.  Some of the items, like the taco shells and healthy oat packs were spur of the moment add-ins. Usually we make the shells, and usually I am too budget conscious to buy packaged oats but I thought it would be fun to give the boys each a box for a treat. You may wonder what I will do with such a huge bag of carrots. I juice them! I love juiced carrots and go through them way too fast. I got them for $9 at King Supers.

Anyway, here are our groceries for the next while.